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3rd Transport India 2018 Expo

Outline Conference Programme 2018

Day 1: 23 May 2018 (Wednesday)
Time Room A
1000-1100 hrs Opening Ceremony
1100-1130 hrs Networking break
1130-1300 hrs Inaugural Conference Session: Implementing Smart Cities.... Transforming India for our Citizens
1300-1400 hrs Lunch
Time Conference Room C (Unnati)
1400-1645 hrs Session: EV and Battery Tech India Summit
With clean energy goals to achieve, many countries have set targets to go emission free. This includes India, which seeks that every vehicle sold in the country should be a zero-emission vehicle by 2030. Today, globally, around 95% of electric vehicles (EVs) are sold in just ten countries i.e. Canada, China, France, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the UK, USA. These countries have strong policy strategies and incentives when it comes to owning electric vehicles.

In India, the time is ripe for EVs to become mainstream. Active engagement of the government, both at the centre and the state, with private players is the need of the hour for setting up a robust EV ecosystem.

In a bid to advance India’s electric mobility campaign, a draft policy framed by NITI Aayog, suggests that the government should give benefits to electric vehicles such as free parking for three years, tolls waiver, designated parking spaces, green number plates and so on. The government is also seeking investment from domestic and foreign firms to raise capital that will be spent on purchasing EVs, three wheelers, batteries; and setting up public charging points across the country.

The government is exploring options to reduce taxes on EVs, and while expecting tax sops and other incentives, auto majors like Ashok Leyland, BMW, Hyundai, Mahindra, Maruti Suzuki, Nissan, Tata Motors, Tesla, Volvo, etc. have announced plans to invest in India’s EV programme. Ashok Leyland will invest about $61.5 million - $77 million to expand its electric product range; Maruti Suzuki is looking for collaborations in the areas of materials handling, battery recycling and reuse besides charging infrastructure. Tesla has expressed interest to enter the country’s EV market, provided the government offers some form of import exemption on EVs; and Mumbai-based JSW Energy plans to invest $623 million in electric cars, batteries, and charging infrastructure. Since electric technologies are not yet cost efficient due to battery prices, the government is considering sale of two-wheelers, three-wheelers and city buses without batteries to cut costs and reduce pollution levels.

The government plans to amend the Electricity Act to allow entities other than power distributors as one way to speed up growth in vehicle charging stations. Other benefits of remarkable transformation is that it will serve solar power developers and lithium ion battery makers. The future of solar power and EVs in India is closely interlinked, given that EVs have batteries that can offer a storage solution to India’s solar energy push.

However, it may not be an easy ride as India does not have enough lithium reserves to manufacture lithium-ion batteries (lithium is the key raw material for the batteries used in EVs); a large build-out of vehicle charging infrastructure; and a robust smart electricity grid to take the additional load. The country also needs regulations to create the ecosystem for EVs to operate smoothly, I.e. fast charging networks, distribution licence, etc.

But there is good news, too. India is one of the world’s largest automobile markets. For India to stay ahead of the curve in the EV space, the government could stimulate mobility transformation by providing the right policy environment, better incentives, and quality infrastructure to accelerate the transition to EVs.

At the EV and Battery Tech India Summit, focus will be on the regulatory landscape, and the strategic road map to help the country achieve rapid, large-scale deployment of electric vehicles, and more.

Day 2: 24 May 2018 (Thursday)
Time Conference Room C (Unnati)
1000-1130 hrs Session: The Evolving Metro Transit System
Growing cities, rising population, increasing road traffic and deteriorating air quality call for a fundamental shift in how we commute. Public transport is a viable alternative to private modes of transport. India's first metro, the Kolkata Metro, started running almost 25 years ago, while the second one was launched in New Delhi in 2002. Following the success of the Delhi Metro, many other Indian cities have initiated and implemented metro rail projects. According to the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs (MoHUA), at present, there are almost 316 km of metro lines commissioned to ferry people, and more than 500 kms of metro rail are under construction across the country.

More metro lines, improved operational efficiency to deliver a customer-focussed approach, automated metro operations and signalling systems, maintenance of metro networks, integrating metro ticketing with other modes of transport, innovative funding and financing models, facility of interchanges and interconnected platforms, skilling, safety parameters, etc. are needed to run the system intelligently and efficiently. In addition to metro rail for mass transport, there are other viable options, too, such as monorails, trams, light trains, bullet/fast trains, etc. The country needs more systems of public transportation.

The session will focus on strategic discussions with metro rail operators and other stakeholders on improvement and expansion for metro projects, challenges that lie ahead, etc.
1130-1145 hrs Networking break
1145-1315 hrs Session: Efficient and Sustainable City Bus Network
City buses, plying on both long and short distance routes, will remain the primary mode of transport for the majority of Indians. Buses provide cheap and flexible services, in small, medium and metro cities alike. Cities in India need to invest in developing good quality public transport bus services. Only 63 of the 458 Indian cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants have formal public transport bus services. Many cities lack sustained institutional and financial support to strengthen their bus systems.

Inadequacies of the public bus transport system are partially addressed by informal Intermediate Public Transport (IPT) services like taxis, informal shared auto-rickshaws providing shuttle services, school buses and chartered bus services, etc.

Though cities continue to build wider roads, flyovers and expressways, these provide short-term relief from traffic congestion. Moreover, these encourage people to use private transportation, which leads to further traffic congestion, fuel consumption and air pollution.

Given, it's cheaper to use public transportation to commute than it is to buy your own vehicle, bus systems provide the best solution for India to scale up public transport systems across all cities. By building better and high quality bus transport services, India’s developmental and environmental objectives can be fulfilled.

The forum will share ideas and exchange opinions to improve and expand bus services to reduce urban traffic congestion.
1315-1400 hrs Lunch
1400-1515 hrs Session: Road Safety Crisis
India has the dubious distinction of registering the highest number of road fatalities in the world due to untrained drivers, poor traffic management, minimal use of technologies, flawed road design, inadequate law enforcement, badly maintained highways, cars that fail modern crash tests, etc.

Alarmed by the increasing fatalities, the government has formulated a multi-pronged strategy to address the issue of road safety based on "4Es" viz. education, engineering (both of roads and vehicles), enforcement and emergency care.

Serious measures to control road accidents include substantial increase in traffic fines and penalties for dangerous driving, imposing stringent regulations on car manufacturers, and employing technology, such as automated driving tests, to cut down on corruption, etc.

The session will address the road safety crisis, and define the urgent measures needed to achieve the target to halve road traffic deaths by 2020.

Inadequacies of the public bus transport system are partially addressed by informal Intermediate Public Transport (IPT) services like taxis, informal shared auto-rickshaws providing shuttle services, school buses and chartered bus services, etc.

Though cities continue to build wider roads, flyovers and expressways, these provide short-term relief from traffic congestion. Moreover, these encourage people to use private transportation, which leads to further traffic congestion, fuel consumption and air pollution.

Given, it's cheaper to use public transportation to commute than it is to buy your own vehicle, bus systems provide the best solution for India to scale up public transport systems across all cities. By building better and high quality bus transport services, India’s developmental and environmental objectives can be fulfilled.

The forum will share ideas and exchange opinions to improve and expand bus services to reduce urban traffic congestion.
1515-1530 hrs Networking break
1530-1645 hrs Session: Parking Woes in India
The increasing number of cars and lack of parking space is one of India’s biggest urban nightmares. The pace at which new cars are registered has worsened the parking crisis, and has led to a host of other problems such as traffic congestion, encroachments, no pedestrian walkways, etc. To keep up with the burden of millions of cars, increasing the number of parking lots is not a solution. Since parking availability significantly affects the probability of choosing to own a car, the government’s plan to allow registration of vehicles only if the owner is able to show proof of access to a parking space will have a prohibitive effect on vehicle ownership. The impact of parking regulations must also be seen in a larger context, one in which land-use and public transport are all taken into account. Developing efficient public transport and mass transit systems are ways to end traffic congestion and parking shortage. Surged parking, multi-level car parking, are other ideal ways to deal with the country's parking woes. Also, instead of uniform parking charges, there could be differential charges depending upon the area and demand.

The forum will address the glaring disparity between the number of vehicles, the need for parking facilities to accommodate them, latest trends in intelligent parking, smart cities and more.

Day 3: 25 May 2018 (Friday)
Time Conference Room C (Unnati)
1000-1130 hrs Session: Sustainable Roads and Highways of India
The development of road infrastructure in India is witnessing significant momentum. Robust demand, higher investments, attractive opportunities and policy support has changed the face of the road sector in the country in recent years. India has the second largest road network across the world at 5.4 million km. This road network transports almost 85 percent of the country's passenger traffic and more than 60 percent of its freight. The government is initiating schemes, policies and business-friendly strategies to further develop the road sector.

To boost infrastructure, the government allocated $10.13 billion for development of national highways in the Union Budget 2017-18. The Government has approved nearly 10,000 km of national highways, and plans to build 50,000 km of roads worth $250 billion by 2022. The National Highways Authority of India's FASTags for electronic toll collection can now be bought online and offline through common services centres near toll plazas. Other progressive reforms include investment through PPP models, cumulative FDI inflows for construction of roads and highways, infrastructure, initiatives such as Bharat Nirman, JNNURM designed to pursue nation-wide rural connectivity, linking all the unconnected villages with fair weather roads, tax sops for companies engaged in road projects, etc.

Topics range from adoption of latest technology for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of sustainable roads to sustainable rural road network development to financing alternatives and more.
1130-1145 hrs Networking break
1145-1315 hrs Session: Autonomus and Connected Vehicles
Indian motorists are increasingly looking for connectivity and improved in-vehicle user experiences. Given the lower prices and the large market for small to mid-segment cars in India, many manufacturers are launching significantly de-featured versions of their connectivity platforms. According to a recent report, the global connected car market is expected to grow from 5.1 million units in 2015 to 37.7 million units by 2022, at a CAGR of 35.54 percent during the forecast period. Features like safety sensors, detailed engine maintenance signals and smartphone integration, in-car entertainment, navigation, etc. are common in new upmarket vehicles. Given the smart-city initiatives gaining momentum, vehicular automation, intelligent transport systems that allow vehicles to communicate with other vehicles (V2V), pedestrians (V2P), and infrastructure (V2I) have already been in development. They are being used in some spheres with a degree of standardisation and regulatory support through spectrum allocation for intelligent transport systems, and proof-of-concept deployment initiatives taken by government departments.

The session will explore how trends in sensors, vehicle-to-vehicle communications, and more are poised to transform tomorrow’s transport.
1315-1400 hrs Lunch
1400-1600 hrs
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